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Robert Theleen

with moderator Dr. Roy Curry

Recorded July 27th, 2020

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Robert Theleen with moderator Dr. Roy Curry, July 27, 2020

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US-China relations- A cold war or a Cold Peace-meeting the challenges of China in the 21st Century

The trajectory of China’s transparency and openness which began 40 years ago has been closed recently. China is presenting US policymakers with far greater challenges than at the height of the Cold War with the Soviet Union.

Bob will attempt to provide a number of thought-provoking ideas to assist all of us in understanding in the most critical foreign policy issue for America in this century.

What are some of the myths and realities of China today that we do not read about in our mainstream press? What would make an outline of an effective foreign policy for the US to meet China’s challenges in the 21st century? And, most importantly, can we meet those challenges without a hot war between the two most powerful countries in the world.

Bob Theleen has lived and worked in China for more than 35 years. He does not just observe China, he has lived it and participated in China’s economic rise since its inception in the late 70s. He has worked with China’s senior leadership, launched the first Venture Capital fund in China with his Chinese wife in 1981 and was a pioneer investor in key industries all through these years. Bob was one of the first foreign directors of a major Chinese State-owned industry, the prestigious Beijing Enterprises. He was the first foreigner to be appointed to the Government’s financial reform task force in 2007 and he was three-times elected Chairman of the American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai. He currently chairs the Shanghai President’s Roundtable, consisting of 62 CEOs of US and European multinational companies in China.

Bob is a frequent writer and speaker on China and he lives and works in Shanghai running ChinaVest, the oldest American financial and strategic advisory company operating in China since 1980.

 

Dr. Roy Curry is certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. He received his B.S. and M.D. from University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. He was a teacher at California Pacific Medical Center as well as participating in several professional organizations including the California Society of Industrial Medicine and Surgery. Dr. Curry has received numerous awards including the Medal of Commendation from the US Public Health Service, a Falk Fellow from American Psychiatric Association, was on the Committee on Psychiatry and Foreign Policy, Brookings Institute, Washington, DC.

A world traveler who has spent time in China and the Far East, Dr. Curry has been an active participant in the World Affairs Council, a Hoover Council Member, the Pacific Research Institute and chair of the library committee at the PU club in San Francisco.

Get ready to join Bob in conversation, Monday, July 27.

In the meantime, we invite you to take a moment now to help shape this upcoming conversation:

Check out the list of questions submitted by other registered attendees, and then vote to support any of the ones that match your own interests.

Feel free to add your own question. Then spread the word to make sure others have the chance to help move your question to the top of the shared list.

  • 5

    votes

    Where do you see the relationship between China and America in five years time

  • 3

    votes

    What are some of the myths about China folks in the US are exposed to? What are the realities we are not exposed to?

  • 3

    votes

    What led you to move to China over 35 years ago? Why have you stayed?

  • 2

    votes

    With the closure of China’s Houston Consulate and their retaliation ordering the closure of the U.S. consulate in Chengdu as yet another signal of the escalation of tensions between the two counties, what is the likelihood in your opinion that we will see any lessening of such tensions, either economically, politically or otherwise, between now and the November election?

  • 2

    votes

    How have you navigated the cultural barriers as you engage in business in China?

  • 1

    votes

    What is the last thing you read that moved you?

  • 1

    votes

    What new critical foreign policy issues have emerged between America and China by way of this pandemic, in your eyes?

  • 1

    votes

    What do you think extra ordinary economic growth of China in last three decades is dependent upon what?