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Min Jin Lee

in conversation with Julia Flynn Siler

Recorded July 13th, 2020

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Min Jin Lee in conversation with Julia Flynn Siler

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Min Jin Lee‘s Pachinko is an epic story that follows a Korean family who migrates to Japan; it is the first novel written for an adult, English-speaking audience about the Korean Japanese people.

Min is a writer whose award-winning fiction explores the intersection of race, ethnicity, immigration, class, religion, gender, and identity of a diasporic people. She is a recipient of fiction fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Study at Harvard, and the New York Foundation for the Arts.

A New York Times Bestseller, Pachinko was also a Top 10 Books of the Year for BBC, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and the New York Public Library. Pachinko was a selection for “Now Read This,” the joint book club of PBS NewsHour and The New York Times. It was on over 75 best books of the year lists, including NPR, PBS, and CNN. Pachinko will be translated into over 30 languages and is an international bestseller.

Min was born in Seoul, South Korea and immigrated to Queens, New York with her family when she was seven years old. She studied history at Yale College and law at Georgetown University. Lee practiced law for two years before turning to writing. She teaches fiction and essay writing at Amherst College and lives in New York City.

 

Julia Flynn Siler is a New York Times bestselling author and journalist. Her latest book, The White Devil’s Daughters: The Women Who Fought Against Slavery in San Francisco’s Chinatown, is a finalist in nonfiction for the California Book Award and was named an “Editors’ Choice” title by the New York Times.

The White Devil’s Daughters: The Women Who Fought Against Slavery in San Francisco’s Chinatown is a finalist in the non-fiction category for the 89th annual California Book Awards. The annual California Book Awards, which began in 1931, recognize the state’s best writers and illuminate the wealth and diversity of literature written in California.

As a veteran correspondent for the Wall Street Journal and BusinessWeek magazine, Julia spent more than two decades in Europe and the United States, reporting from a dozen countries. She has covered fields as varied as biotechnology, cult wines, puppy breeding, and a princess’s quest to restore a Hawaiian palace’s lost treasures. She has also appeared as a commentator on the BBC, CBS, CNBC, NPR, and has written for the New York TimesWashington Post, and the Los Angeles Times.

Get ready to join Min in conversation, Monday, July 13.

In the meantime, we invite you to take a moment now to help shape this upcoming conversation:

Check out the list of questions submitted by other registered attendees, and then vote to support any of the ones that match your own interests.

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  • 7

    votes

    What does your creative process look like when you start writing a novel?

  • 5

    votes

    What inspired you to begin writing and exploring the topic of the Korean diaspora?

  • 4

    votes

    You once said “All art is political because it is created by people. I explicitly intended to write political novels”. What political philosophy or theory has helped shape you and your work?

  • 4

    votes

    Who are some of your favorite authors, whether fiction or non-fiction, and have they influenced your writing?

  • 3

    votes

    Hoe did growing up in a working class family affect your writing?

  • 3

    votes

    How did your time practicing law inform your writing?

  • 2

    votes

    What is the role of art in political movements?

  • 1

    votes

    Has anything you’ve written triggered trauma? If so, how have you dealt with that?

  • 1

    votes

    Does you research process differ for your non-fiction writing?

  • 1

    votes

    How might you approach a global event like the pandemic, with its world-altering effects, in your future writing?

  • 1

    votes

    In what ways does faith sustain you during these difficult times?

  • 1

    votes

    Ideas you are toying with for your next book?