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Isabel Allende

in conversation with Don George

Recorded July 13th, 2020

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Isabel Allende in conversation with Don George

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Isabel Allende, novelist and philanthropist, is one of the most widely read authors in the world and has sold more than 74 million books. Born in Peru and raised in Chile, she won worldwide acclaim in 1982 with the publication of her hugely popular first novel, The House of the Spirits. Since then, she has authored more than twenty-three bestselling and critically acclaimed books, including the recent novel A Long Petal of the Sea.

Allende also devotes much of her time to human rights causes, including a charitable foundation she founded in honor of her late daughter Paula, which has awarded grants to more than 100 nonprofits worldwide, delivering life-changing care to hundreds of thousands of women and girls. In addition, more than 8 million viewers have watched her TED talks on leading a passionate life.

Her honors and awards are legion, including fifteen honorary doctorates, induction into the California Hall of Fame, the PEN Center Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Anisfield-Wolf Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2014, President Barack Obama awarded Allende the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor, and in 2018 she received the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters from the National Book Foundation.

 

National Geographic has called Don George “a legendary travel writer and editor.” Don has been Travel Editor at the San Francisco Examiner & Chronicle, founder and editor of Salon.com’s Wanderlust travel site, and Global Travel Editor for Lonely Planet. He is currently Editor at Large for National Geographic Travel. Don’s best essays and articles from 40 years of travel writing have been collected in the award-winning anthology The Way of Wanderlust: The Best Travel Writing of Don George, published by Travelers Tales. Don is also the author of the bestselling travel writing guide in the world, How to Be a Travel Writer, published by Lonely Planet. Don has edited twelve acclaimed literary travel anthologies, including An Innocent Abroad, Better Than Fiction, and The Kindness of Strangers. In addition to writing and editing, Don is a tour leader and lecturer for National Geographic Expeditions and GeoEx; he also teaches writing workshops, speaks on campuses and at conferences, and consults with travel brands around the globe. Don is co-founder and chairman of the acclaimed Book Passage Travel Writers & Photographers Conference, now in its 29th year.

Get ready to join Isabel in conversation, Monday, July 13.

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Check out the list of questions submitted by other registered attendees, and then vote to support any of the ones that match your own interests.

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    What is your process like as a bilingual storyteller? In which language do you write? Do you find that meaning is lost in translation?

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    Having been a political refugee after the Chilean coup, what has your reaction been to the recent manifestaciones across Chile?

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    What books are you reading now? How do you decide what to read next?

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    You are an incredibly resilient writer who has lived through so much crisis, upheaval, and trauma. What advice do you have for creators in times like these?

  • 2

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    HELP…. the video is not working

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    How has the pandemic affected your life and writing?

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    What does magical realism mean to you? What inspires you to write often in that genre?

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    How does a writer become a serious novelist?

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    If you had to be quarantined for a week with a character from one of your books, who would it be?

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    The House of the Spirits and Paula alike are such personal windows into your own grief, being based on your loved ones. What is it like sharing that with the world?